Comments on Ajax versus SOA and Smart Clients

For those of you who know Swedish, there’s some interesting discussion (post 1, post 2, with comments) at Dag König’s blog, related to my previous two posts (post 1, post 2) about Ajax versus Smart Clients. For those who don’t, here’s a summary from my perspective:

In his first post, Dag says that the internal email sent by Bill Gates recently fits very well into the SOA view of developing software.

Then, I comment on this, stating that the Web 2.0 way of developing applications rather focuses on  more "lightweight" technologies (since SOA development is usually viewed as more "heavyweight"), and Microsoft "turning ship" could instead mean that they are  turning away from their SOA focus (they won’t skip it, I’m sure). But I say that probably Microsoft will probably win this battle anyway, due to their effort on Smart Clients: those will be needed to make use of the Web 2.0 services when we’re not online (that still happens, and will happen to many people, occasionally during the coming few years).

Dag replies in a second post that when the Web 2.0 services will be used for more important services, we’ll see that more of a SOA view (and associated technologies) will be necessary (several Web 2.0 services are publishing external APIs). And that Microsoft will get to show its advantages (they’ve invested a lot into SOA) when that time comes. In addition, it’s possible to be online more and more of the time, so the importance of offline clients decreases. But nevertheless, there are technologies that bridge the two worlds: click-once and Java applets.

My comment to that post is that I agree that when for example digital identity management will be required for those services, we’ll probably see more heavyweight protocols being used. But there’s no immediate pressure for using SOA at the moment. And that those bridging technologies are actually the smart clients (where Microsoft will get its payback, as commented in my previous post).

End of discussion, so far. Looking forward to more discussions of this kind! 🙂

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One Response

  1. Ajax vs. SOA

    While surfing the web, I happened to find a blog entry by Dion Hinchcliffe, containing some interesting observations on the conflict between Ajax and SOA, related to my recent discussion with Dag König. The most interesting part is the enumeration

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